Rag'n'Bone Man - Human

  • In Review
  • 09:00 on 8th Feb 2017
  • By Craig HuntleyCraig Huntley

Hailing from Uckfield, East Sussex, Rag'n'Bone Man started out in the drum n' bass scene MC-ing as part of The Rum Committee. Supporting eclectic acts such as Pharoahe Monch and KRS-One he planted his musical roots and developed a following. Encouraged by his father to sing at a blues jam at a local pub, Rory Graham became Rag'n'Bone Man, and after a self-released EP Blues Town comes his debut full lengther Human.

What strikes home on first listen is the diversity across the twelve tracks here. There's something for all music fans and to label this one particular genre is hard. Lead single 'Human' has hit peak radio play with its groove thump and a guttural vocal that transcends the track, where second track 'Innocent Man' has a John Legend influence, especially on the vocals and soulful rhythm. If you want music that makes a connection it's here. If you're remembering lost love then you want to feel the lyrics and singer convey your emotions and 'Skin' has this in spades "When I run out of air and ghosts I see" repeats itself through the song, there's an emotion conveyed across the lyrics and you can't help but be moved by the uplifting melodies and heart thumping bass.

This is an accomplished debut album from Rag'n'Bone Man. The British music industry needs a shock to get out of its stale position. Less of the X Factor conveyor belt clones, more realism, more streetwise music is needed to diversify genres. Human transcends genre, a debut album hasn't been this needed since 19. See Rag'n'Bone Man in a small venue now, before you're up in the nosebleed seats and he's a blip in the distance.

Verdict

A soulful, streetwise debut from a major new talent.
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